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Errol Thompson

Jamaican recording engineer, often known simply as Errol T or ET. He began his career as an apprentice to Sylvan Morris at Studio One before moving on to Randy?s studio at 17 North Parade, Kingston. One of his first jobs there was to engineer Bob Marley?s ?Soul Rebels? session, produced by Lee Perry, which many people cite as Marley?s finest work. It was at this time Thompson began experimenting with new Dub effects and he mixed one of the first Dub albums to appear, the legendary ?Java Java Java? in 1973
He then began working with producer, label boss and record shop owner Joe Gibbs, recording massive hits such as Dennis Brown?s ?Money In My Pocket? and Peter Tosh?s ?Maga Dog? on a very basic 2 track set-up in the back of Gibbs? record shop

In the mid 70?s their success led to them relocating to a new, bigger and better equipped studio back on North Parade. Now Gibbs and Thompson became known as The Mighty Two, Thompson?s talents as both engineer and producer now being fully recognised. At the new studio many top artists had hits such as Culture (Two Sevens Clash), Sylford Walker (Burn Babylon), Trinity (Three Piece Suit) and Althea and Donna?s incredibly catchy answer record to the latter ?Uptown Top Ranking?, which not only went to number 1 in Jamaica but also reached number 1 in the UK pop charts, a very unusual event indeed. Thompson also released successful records on his own Errol T and Belmont labels

The Mighty Two continued to dominate the Reggae charts for the rest of the decade and in 1979 a remake of Dennis Brown?s ?Money In My Pocket? enjoyed almost the same level of success as ?Uptown Top Ranking?. They also recorded legendary Dub albums, most notably the ?African Dub? series. By the early 1980?s Dancehall had become the order of the day but The Mighty Two continued to have hits such as Nigger Kojak and Liza?s ?Fist To Fist Rub A Dub?, Junior Murvin?s ?Cool Out Son? and Eek A Mouse?s ?Virgin Girl?.

The next turn of events occurred after a legal battle over a JC Lodge song originally written by Charley Pride left Gibbs bankrupt and he left Jamaica for Miami. However, the Mighty Two were reunited when Gibbs returned to Jamaica in the early 90s and they maintained a close working relationship up until Thompson?s untimely death following a stroke in 2004

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